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20120926
20121004
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with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. john is an independent. hey there. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have neverwhat they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. i voted for ross perot once. i am
is cnn's deborah feyerick. >> reporter: it is a scene that played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enacted by republican controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos, groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there is no fraud in our elections, but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly exclude thousands or hundreds of thousands of eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws protect only against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing state, lawyers for both sides admit no known cases of in person fraud. still, it is a problem says conservative columnist john fund, an expert on the subj
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)